January 3, 2020

The Leica MP rocks. Technically, this 35mm film camera is built to be tough, simple, reliable, and to be that photographic companion for the lifetime of the owner. This is going to be a camera review without sample pictures. Why? This is purely a mechanically driven metal box, the pictures that come out of it are driven by your choice of film, lens, and … skill with a camera.
It is funny, when we receive promotional or items like this from Leica, they tend to arrive better packed than expensive lenses and cameras from other manufacturers. That was what the dealer at the camera store told me when I bought the Leica Travel Mug.
After testing, I am confident to say this lens is sharp all the way from F2.8 to F16 and only falls over when you each F22. My test wasn’t exactly scientific. I’m not a pixel peeper. I don’t buy lenses just to test them.
I actually think this whole issue, and this page, should not exist. The debate about shooting RAW or JPEG is such a contentious one, far more than it has to. There are strong opposing views, and when debating them, most people online seem to turn into angry 15 year old boys.
Kodak Portra is a professional level film admired for it’s high level of detail from a very fine grain, smooth, natural colours but still with a bit of punch and richness, open shadows without crushed blacks and for being hard to blow out highlights.
So…I got to try a Noctilux! But unfortunately only for 1 hour. The Leica Noctilux is the lens most Leica users strive for. At nearly $A15,000 new, this is a 50mm price F0.95. Yep, thats right, F0.95. I don’t techically know how a lens can go below F1.0 (which is what the original Noctilux was), but this lens is super shallow, makes night come alive, and wow, it is just everything Leica stand for in a lens.
Is Kodak Portra a film without character? For me, for what I want from film, yes. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not trying to be negative about what is an excellent film. It’s just to me, Kodak Portra is too perfect.
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