Leica Lens Review

I’ve had the Leica 28mm F1.4 Summilux for 3 months at the time of writing this review. In that time I’ve trialled it for landscapes, close ups, low light. All the samples in this review are unedited, I want to show you a true indication of what the lens is capable of, and let you edit them for yourself to your liking.
Model Number 11145 46mm Filter Thread F3.4 to F16 Apature Range Four Low Dispersion Elements One Double Sided Aspherical Element Angle of View [diagonal/horizontal/vertical] 90°/80°/50° (when used on a 35mm sensor or film camera 8 Lenses in 7 groups With the manual focus, you can focus as close as 70cm or 2.3’ 263grams (this is important to consider for landscape photography) Metal screw on lens hood.
After testing, I am confident to say this lens is sharp all the way from F2.8 to F16 and only falls over when you each F22. My test wasn’t exactly scientific. I’m not a pixel peeper. I don’t buy lenses just to test them.
So…I got to try a Noctilux! But unfortunately only for 1 hour. The Leica Noctilux is the lens most Leica users strive for. At nearly $A15,000 new, this is a 50mm price F0.95. Yep, thats right, F0.95. I don’t techically know how a lens can go below F1.0 (which is what the original Noctilux was), but this lens is super shallow, makes night come alive, and wow, it is just everything Leica stand for in a lens.
In my view, the 35mm Summicron is the sharpest lens made by Leica. Hands down. I’ve made some samples available in full resolution to show off the power of this lens. It is a classic. Particularly for street photography. In classic Leica M style, it has a focusing tab, is pure metal, and the hood is detachable.
The Leica 28mm F2.8 Elmarit is not one of the most expensive (Leica) lenses, but sure is one of the best performing at the wide end. Its Aspherical! As with a lot of my gear reviews, the photo samples in this are available in full res to check out.
There are two versions of the Leica 50mm F2 Summicron. The non APO, or the amazing uber expensive APO. Both are F2. The APO is, by accounts, way sharper, but this review is about my non APO version (which is still bloody amazing).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWmA1cmtmpc I’m comparing what are two if the best cameras by two of the best manufactures with what is regarded as some of their best lenses as far as sharpness goes. I was inspired to run this test myself after reading up on Ken Rockwell’s similar test here.